5 Ideas from ICE & DCSS 2019

Earlier this month I had the opportunity to attend two excellent conferences ICE, which helps teachers learn about edtech, and DCSS which focuses on improving Social Studies instruction.

Here were some a few of my takeaways from both conferences:

#1 Challenge students to ask more questions and solve real problems (via @BusEdCrev , inspired by @joykirr

  • Students need to learn how to learn. Teachers shouldn’t do everything for students (like someone has done for this man his whole life). 
  • The inventor of the Rubik cube reminds us that questions are often more important than answers; when the right person finds the right question, amazing things happen. This video is a great way to kick off Genius Hour, Passion Projects, 20% time, etc). 
  • When we empower students to ask questions and solve problems, they will begin to see themselves in a new light (like this newly empowered cat).
  • This  brainstorming guide can help students identify a powerful question or problem to guide their research. Don’t short change this step! Students have become accustomed to answering our questions so they generally need a lot of help constructing an effective focus that can guide their work for many months.
  • Similar to how consultants, lawyers, etc. track their billable time, ask students to carefully chart how they use class time & set goals at the end of every class.

#2 If a group of student asked you to kneel with them during the national anthem—would you? (via @kevindua

  • Situation: Five of your students come to meet you after class and share, “We’re planning on kneeling during the national anthem at the next pep rally to protest black oppression & police violence, do you think we should do it?  Will you join us?”
    • What would you ask them prior to your response?
    • Do you think they should do it? (Why or why not)
    • Would you join them? (Why or why not)
    • What is your school’s “policy” on the anthem participation?
    • Would you encourage other students/teachers to join?
    • How does your response support or oppose a culture of violence?
  • Instead of just discussing theoretically what we would do in the situation below, Kevin had us actually stand, sit, or kneel.
  • Takeaway: Don’t be afraid of making teachers feel a little uncomfortable during professional development, it empowers them to step out of their comfort zones when they return to their classrooms.
  • Establish norms so that students (and teachers) are willing to take risks:
    • Try to be curious & present
    • Recognize intent vs impact
    • Be an active learner & participant
    • Anticipate different views
    • Share what makes sense to share
    • Respectfulness is earned, not mandatory
    • Nurture/nature shapes our identities, culture & climate

#3 Make your curriculum a mirror of & a window into your students diverse identities (via Carolyn Wahlskog of 360 Youth Services) 

  • Examine your curriculum is it a mirror (which encourages students to reflect on their own social identities) and a mirror (which affirms students’ diverse social identities & experiences)?
  • Caolyn shared a great visual for getting a quick overview of the differences between gender identity, gender expression, biological sex, and attraction
genderbread-person-3.3
SOURCE: itspronouncedmetrosexual

 

#4 Combat the Drop in Reading Comprehension of Digital Texts (via @Stacey0410 & @AmyRolain

  • Research shows that there is a small decline in reading comprehension of digital texts compared to print.
  • Just as we teach reading strategies for textbooks, we need to explicitly show students how to read digital texts which often include more pictures, videos, and (hyper)linked content.
  • We can also format digital texts to increase rates of comprehension. The Nielsen Norman Group offers the following tips:  
  1. Use headings and subheadings. Ensure they look more important, and are more visible, than normal text so users may distinguish them quickly.
  2. Start headings and subheadings with the words carrying most information: if users see only the first 2 words, they should still get the gist of the following section.
  3. Visually group small amounts of related content — for instance, by surrounding them with a border or using a different background.
  4. Bold important words and phrases.
  5. Take advantage of the different formatting of links, and ensure that links include information-bearing words (instead of generic “go”, “click here” or “more”). This technique also improves accessibility for users who hear links read aloud instead of scanning the content visually.
  6. Use bullets and numbers to call out items in a list or process.
  7. Cut unnecessary content.

#5 Show Students What We’ve Done to the Earth in 3 Seconds (via @kimbarbaro & Matt Boyer)

  • See what human’s have done to the Earth in 3 seconds
  • The National Geographic Learning Framework and Educator Guides are great resources for creating hands-on geography projects for K-12 students.
    • Example: Have students geo-tag all the trash in a defined area, analyze the data, and implement a solution for reducing littering. Act locally, think globally!

98a6ae70-e9a7-4863-8b13-4fee04ac793b

  • Survey123 by ArcGis can help students collect geo-tagged data and analyze the data to help answer research questions.
Advertisements

5 Takeaways from ISTE 2018 for English/Language Arts Teachers

Here are some of the tools I came across at ISTE 2018 that seemed promising for English/Language Arts teachers. I especially appreciated that each tool kept the student  in the center while allowing teachers to provide critical support & feedback. No canned reading programs that students mindlessly click through here!

  1. READING: Activate, support, and reveal student thinking with Actively Learn.

 2. WRITING: Provide actionable feedback throughout the writing process with Writable.

 3. ANNOTATING: Students & teachers can organize annotations by color coded categories with Highlighting Tool, a free Google Doc add on.

 4. FLUENCY: Monitor student growth in pronunciation and support comprehension with a visual dictionary by using Fluency Tutor.

 5. SPEAKING & CREATIVITY: Break the ice and improve students’ speaking skills with an auto-generated slideshow of images based on a topic you choose in Pecha Flickr.

5 Takeaways from ISTE for Social Studies Teachers

  1. Use Esri’s Geoinquiries and Arcgis Storymaps to help students develop their map analysis skills and Google’s Tour Builder to integrate text, images and maps to create more visually rich stories. (SOURCE: @JChanter22) 

2. Bring history alive by having students interview senior citizens in the community and record their oral histories. (Resources from Milton High School, WI)

3. Use inquiry kits, research modules, and case maker created by Thinkport to scaffold students’ analysis of primary sources from the Library of Congress while creating strong historical arguments.

4. Computational Thinking isn’t just for math or technology class! Use the series of lessons created by Green Dot Public Schools to help students apply computational thinking while designing Greek monuments, annotating a map of Lord of the Flies, creating their own ancient civilizations, and mapping earthquakes.

5. Speak your truth. I was struck by the boldness with which Pernille Ripp (@pernilleripp ) used her platform at an #edtech conference to illustrate white privilege and challenge educators to courageously “dismantle our prejudiced world.” Since I wasn’t able to witness her talk, I read about it here and watched it here.

2017-2018 Reflection

The end of every school year leaves a gnawing feeling of self-doubt: What more could I have taught my students? How could I have developed their skills further? Did I truly inspire anyone? Did I change how they view themselves or the world?

As I sit in front of empty chairs and desks I’m trying to channel this self-doubt into self-reflection and identify what I did well and what I need to improve for next year. Although these reflections are primarily for my own growth, I find that sharing it with others pushes me to think and write more clearly.

Here are 3 of my takeaways from the year:

#1: Be Present

Like many teachers, I often find myself replaying how I handled a tough incident earlier in the day or mentally crafting an email I plan on sending to teachers on my team after school. It’s difficult to be totally present.

To help alleviate this, I have tried to make mindfulness a more regular practice in my classroom. What started with a daily quote, led to Mindful Mondays, and this year, mindful minutes at the start of nearly every class. These daily activities included short breathing exercises, stretches, or reflection questions.

Although I didn’t collect empirical evidence, noticing my own mental state before & after mindful minutes along with anecdotes from students, I am convinced that taking just a couple minutes to breathe, reflect, or move can truly help us be more fully present with the people and work in front of us.

 

Next year, I plan on researching more effective mindfulness activities and practicing them more regularly so it becomes a consistent habit for myself and my students.

#2: Really Know Your Students

When I’m interacting with nearly a 100 students over the course of a school year, it’s often easier to get excited about trying new tech tool or lesson than trying to get to know each and every student. However, I have never regretted the time I invested building relationships with students while I can’t say the same about the former.

For example, this year, I had a refugee student in my U.S. History class who has lived in 3 different countries in the last few years, and for whom English is her 3rd or 4th language. To make matters worse, she had an ongoing medical condition which made her really tired and miss a fair amount school. Despite all of these challenges, she worked harder than nearly all of her peers and earned a scholarship to a solid 4-year university.

Hearing her story and observing her determination daily helped me get perspective on my own life. It also reminded me that students are the best source of inspiration. While I do spend time getting to know all my students, too often my knowledge of each student stays at the surface level—interests & hobbies—instead of life stories.

Next year, I plan on making more time to regularly chat with individual students whether it’s during passing periods, conferences during class, and by using online tools.

#3 Break Free from Technology Addiction

This year I became more keenly aware of the harm technology can do to our minds. As an enthusiastic user of technology who helps other teachers innovate while utilizing technology this was hard to come to terms with. However, I believe, integrating technology effectively requires me to be clear eyed about its potential & pitfalls.

Watching videos like these helped me realize how social media is designed to leverage weaknesses in human psychology. Specifically, variable reward schedules via dopamine hits get people hooked which fuels social media companies’ ad-driven business model.

Also, reading books like Deep Work made me realize how the immediate bite sized rewards from technology has rewired our brains and made it much more difficult for me to work on challenging, thinking-intensive activities for long, sustained periods of time.

Finally, a couple months ago I read this blog post by Pernille Ripp, a middle school teacher from Wisconsin who I really respect, on how she is trying to get her students off cellphones during class. I have started to make similar changes with my students.

This summer, I want to make sure I’m using technology more deliberately by not tweeting and mindlessly reading articles while surfing the web. Instead, I want to spend more time reading books and re-reading all the ideas I ‘liked’ on Twitter and planning how to apply them to my classroom.

Top 10 Takeaways from ICE 2018

The national ICE Conference (February 26-28, 2018) was an incredible opportunity learn from incredible teachers, instructional coaches, and administrators from around the U.S. Although the focus was on educational technology I was especially interested in sessions that addressed practical considerations for pedagogy.

Here are my Top 10 Takeaways from ICE 2018:

1. Teach Digital Literacy by Modeling how to See, Think, Wonder and Create

Kristin Ziemeke (@kristin_ziemeke) made a compelling case for the evolution of literacy  (just think of all the different media you consumed during the past week!) Then, she offered a few ideas on how to improve digital literacy instruction.

First, we must continue to improve students’ underlying literacy skills and love for reading by offering:

  • Choice: Students can often read a text that is to 2 grade levels higher than their current reading level when they get to choose the text they read.
  • Volume: Provide many opportunities to read; libraries are more important than ever in this digital age.
  • Authentic Response: Encourage students to respond to reading in authentic ways– informal discussions, journals, etc.

Second, while teaching digital literacy can seem daunting, we can model what we already do as expert readers for our students: see, think, and wonder. For example, we could project an image like the one below and model for students how we observe various details, then show what those details make us think about, and finally share the questions that arise in our minds.

SOURCE: Filip Warwick

Here are some resources to help teachers create tech (text) sets for your curriculum:

Finally, Kristin argued that students need to spend more time creating media, not just consuming it. Currently, approximately 65% of the time teens are using digital technology they consume content but spend only 3% of their time creating it.

We should strive to design more assignments that allow students to create infographics, videos, blog posts, etc. The process of changing ideas from text to visual (or vice versa) leads to increased activity in both halves of the brain and deeper learning.

 2. You Build or Break a Culture During Every Interaction

Joe Sanfelippo (@Joe_Sanfelippo ) reminded us that every interaction, whether it’s with a student, colleague or parent can build or break a school’s culture. It doesn’t take long! In 30 seconds we can promote great work of a colleague, thank someone, get to know a student, and more. Make every interaction count!

 3. Reassess your Gradebook

Joy Kirr (@joykirr) pushed us to re-examine what, how, and why we grade in our classroom. A large body of evidence shows that feedback without a grade leads to the largest student growth.

There’s no one right way to do grades; but, we shouldn’t continue grading the way we’ve always done it because…that’s how it’s always been done. We have to stop being the monkey trying to grade everything and push students across the finish line (end of the quarter, semester, etc.):

The activity below can help re-examine our views on grading. For additional resources on feedback & grading, check out her impressive collection in her livebinder.

Sort the terms on the right into the categories on the left:

What needs to be included in the gradebook?

Extra Credit

Formative Assessment

Homework

Late Work Penalty

Points

Redos/Revisions

Reflection

Rubrics

Standards

Summative Assessment

0s for Missing Work

4. The 3 Keys to Successful PD: Learning, Experimenting and Reflecting

Kristi Sutter (@kristi_sutter) and her team at The Feast showed why all professional development must include time for teachers to experiment in a supported environment and, most importantly, reflect on what they learned so new tools & practices are integrated thoughtfully.

If you’re bold enough, practice radical transparency during extended professional development by asking participants to complete a feedback form multiple times. Then, read the feedback out loud and share what changes you will make as a result of their feedback.

5a. Affluent Students Need Grit  

Dr. Kenneth Hoover argued that we’re mistaken if we believe the main purpose of teaching “grit” is to motivate students from low socioeconomic backgrounds. Students from less fortunate families often have had to learn how to overcome struggles their entire life while affluent students have experienced few major obstacles in life. Therefore, when affluent students face truly challenging academic curriculum they often don’t know what to do. Affluent students probably need to learn how to be gritty more than their less privileged peers.

giphy

For their entire lives many affluent students have had parents trying to brush away any obstacles along their path like curlers during the Olympics. It’s difficult for parents to let their son or daughter struggle because we always want to give our children more than what we had growing up. However, if we want to raise a resilient generation we must let them face hardships and persist.

5b) Practice should be Interwoven, Varied and Distributed

Using the above chart, Dr. Hoover also argued that we need to quiz/assess students more often; not for a grade but to improve long-term retention. True mastery is when students can apply a concept or skill to unfamiliar contexts. To prepare for this they must have varied and interwoven practice.

For example, hitters who just practice hitting curveballs do worse then those that focus on curve balls but mix in a variety of pitches during practice—that’s what they’ll see in a game!

Book Suggestions: Never Send a Human to do a Machine’s Job and Make it Stick

6. Stop Assigning Fake Work

Kristine Ziemke (@KristinZiemke) challenged us to stop assigning “fake work” and strive to create opportunities for real work that is authentic, important, and relevant. When was the last time you made a diorama? Elementary school?

Have your students do work they will actually do outside of school. We no longer have to wait for the annual science fair to give students a broader audience; use technology to create authentic audiences and address real challenges that are relevant to students.

7. Address Teachers’ Mindsets before you deliver Professional Development

Cindy Crannell (@ccrannell) and Annmarie Clasky (@AClasky) shared why it’s important to introduce the concept of a growth mindset before presenting a new tool or strategy during PD. Too often teachers believe that learning how to use new technology is too hard; they’ll never get it, etc.

Teaching the growth mindset can help teachers  self-monitor when they slip into the fixed mindset and try to move back into a growth mindset. This video can help introduce the concept of a growth mindset:

 

8. 11 Protocols for Creating a Culture of Questioning in your School

Kim Darche (@kimdarche) gave powerful yet practical suggestions for creating a questioning culture among students and adults in your building. While project based learning, genius hour, design thinking, etc are important trends in education,  a critical prerequisite to any of them being successful is students’ ability to ask powerful questions. Unfortunately, this isn’t happening in most classrooms.

Research shows that on average teachers ask 200-300 questions/day while students ask only 2 questions/day. In an age where Alexa, Siri & Google are available at our fingertips there’s a greater need for problem finders than problem solvers.

11 tips for creating a culture of questioning:

    1. Only Questions Allowed: Get brains primed for questioning by asking pairs of students to have a conversation but only using questions. Once someone makes a statement instead of a question, they “lose” and rotate to a new partner.
    2. Question Formulation Technique (@rightquestion). To learn more check out A More Beautiful Question and Make Just One Change
    3. Dice Game: Post a topic for students (e.g. theme in a book, imperialism, climate change, right triangle, etc.). Then, in pairs or small groups students take turns rolling a dice. Based on the number they roll they have to:
      • 1-Define it
      • 2-Support it
      • 3-Flip it
      • 4-What is your stake in the ground about it?
      • 5-Innovate it
      • 6-Question it
    4. Rule of 5 (Inspired by Toyota): Ask Why 5 Times in a Row
      • Start with any problem (e.g. There isn’t enough social & emotional support for students)
        • Why isn’t there support? Lack of Resources
        • Why aren’t there resources? They misallocate resources.
        • Why aren’t priorities aligned with resources? The School Board doesn’t understand the problem.
        • Why doesn’t the school board understand the problem? They don’t spend enough time in classrooms.
      • These series of questions helps us get to the root cause of a problem.
    5. Notecard: Write a problem on a notecard and ask someone else to solve it, this will give you valuable new perspectives. Too often we’re biased and don’t even realize it.
    6. Universal Questions: Commit to memory and make a poster with these questions:
      • How might we….
      • What if….
      • What else…
      • Yes and…
    7. Ask What, Not Why
      • Asking someone ‘Why’ makes them defensive, ask ‘What’ instead
      • E.g. Why didn’t you pay the bill? Makes us defensive. Instead ask “What happened to the bills this month?”
    8. Point of View:
      • Present an issue then ask students to list 5-20 characters who might be involved in the situation and discuss what each of them would do. For example, for bullying students might list parents, teachers, counselors, school bus drivers, etc.
    9. Shrug More Often: Create a habit where students and teachers seek answers to questions on their own. Don’t answer everything for them!
    10. Follow every statement with a question: Help colleagues & students find the root cause of an issue by insisting that all statements be followed by a question (Source: Action Learning in Action). Without such a protocol it would be easy for discussions to devolve into a pity party. Here’s an example of the protocol:
      • Statement: We have a large issue with physical aggression at our school.
      • Q: How large of an issue is it?
      • A: It happens every week.
      • Q: Is it the same group of students?
      • A: Yes …
      • Q: Why is it those group of students?
    11. Use Deborah Meier’s Habits of Mind: Create a poster with these statements for your classroom —they can be used in nearly every subject area. Deborah Meir created an entire school centered on these 5 questions!
      • Evidence: How do you know what’s true or false?
      • Viewpoint: How might this look if we stepped into other shoes?
      • Connections: Have we seen this before?
      • Conjecture: What if it were different?
      • Relevance: Why does this matter?

9. Portfolios Facilitate Student Ownership, Continuous Feedback and Learning Without Grades

Although I wasn’t able to attend their session, the materials Ana Thompson (@AnaAnamta15 ) & Lisa Berghoff (@LisaBerghoff ) shared demonstrated how portfolios create opportunities for frequent feedback and student ownership of learning—especially for ELs!

10. Students can apply Design Thinking in 12 (Fairly Easy) Steps

Sarah Thomas (@sarahdateechur) used her final project from the Google Innovator Academy to show how students can use design thinking to pursue their passions. She also shared the site Rock Your World (@rockyourworld70) which helps students address true global problems like human rights, discrimination, education, homelessness, human trafficking, food insecurity, women’s rights, and access to water.

Sarah has created a Google Form that guides students through the design process which creates a slick Google Doc to help students prototype & set intermediate deadlines.

Design Thinking Steps

Step One: Define the Problem

What is your big idea?

Step Two: Brainstorm Possible Solutions

What can you create or make to address the need identified in Step One?

Step Three: Research Ideas/Explore Possibilities

Do a search, or draw upon your background knowledge to answer the following questions: What similar projects may be out there? How have they addressed this need? Where is there room for improvement?

Step Four: Specify Constraints

What obstacles may be in your way to achieving your goal?

Step Five: Consider Alternatives

How can you overcome these obstacles? Figure out as many possibilities as you can.

Step Six: Select an Approach

Given the information from the first steps, which approach would be the best, and why?

Step Seven: Develop Written Proposal

Come up with a brief plan, highlighting action steps that you plan to use.

(Due: ___________________)

Step Eight: Make Model/Prototype

Try your idea on a small scale.

(Due: ___________________)

Step Nine: Test & Evaluate

Run your prototype! What worked well/what didn’t?

(Due: ___________________)

Step Ten: Refine/Improve

Figure out how you can tweak your model or idea to make it work.

(Due: ___________________)

Step Eleven: Create and Implement Model/Project

Go for the gold!

(Due: ___________________)

Step Twelve: Communicate Results

Use social media to speak about your experiences, and generate more buzz. This guide from The Sullivan Foundation gives some good advice, especially if you are involving students.

21st Century Humanities PD

The steady stream of developments in education technology along with the books and blogs touting the newest, most student-centered methods of teaching makes it difficult to discern fads from true instructional innovations.

Technology should shift how students learn. However, without appropriate professional development teachers will be overwhelmed by the speed with which technology changes or merely replicate traditional teaching methods using digital tools.

The following is a framework for identifying instructional shifts due to technology and what their implications are for teachers and their professional development. 

Vision for Innovative Instruction

Implications for Teachers

Implications for Professional Development

Cultivate learning materials that meet the needs of all students

Although some learning goals necessitate reading a common text together, the textbook and the teacher no longer are the only sources for learning content and skills. Teachers will need to become skilled at cultivating and organizing resources that are appropriate for their students and learning goals. Teachers should train students on how to find and select appropriate resources.

  • Information Literacy
  • Developing a PLC/PLN
  • Differentiation

Create varied methods for demonstrating learning to authentic audiences

To be successful in the 21st century students will need to be skilled collaborators, communicators, critical thinkers and creators. Therefore, teachers will need to design learning activities that teach and assess these skills.

  • Project/Problem Based Learning
  • Multimedia tools & authentic audiences
  • Differentiation

Gather timely & actionable information about learning

Powerful tools now exist that allow teachers to quickly assess students and respond to student needs by creating flexible pathways to learning.

  • Formative Assessment
  • Asynchronous Learning
  • Grading v Assessing
  • Actionable Feedback

Download & Print from Google Classroom

Normally, I’m opposed to printing student assignments. With the proper workflow, I’ve found that I can offer more timely feedback in digital format, not to mention save acres of trees.

However, there are times when you might find that you need to print entire classes worth of documents submitted on Google Classroom. It can be tedious work manually opening each student’s document and printing it—especially if you teach multiple sections of the same class!  Here’s how you can easily download and print student assignments:

  1. Go to the PDF Mergy website
  2. Choose the option that says “select files from Google Drive”

null

3. Give PDF Mergy permission to access your Google Drive by clicking “Allow”

null

4. Find the folder that contains your students’ assignments. (If they submitted the assignment to Google Classroom, the assignments will be in a folder within the “Classroom” folder)

5. Select all the students documents (click and drag or enter CTRL A)

null

6. Click on Merge. The process will take a fair amount of time ( approximately 2-5 minutes).

7. Click “Save PDF to your Computer”

null